Danish street style is honest and realistic

Words Sille Ugelvig, Photo Jonathan Daniel Pryce

Street style is by no means a new phenomenon in the fashion industry, but over the past few years, interest in it has grown. Photographer Adam Katz Sinding, known for his site le21eme, captures the world’s fashion identity through pictures.

“Street style emerged before me. However, the desire to know how other people lead their lives has existed since the dawn of civilization. I remember growing up watching Robin Leach hosting ‘Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous.’  It was my first window into The Lives of Others.  People love to desire, and desire to be like others. We all want to be told what to do, when we cannot decide for ourselves” says Sinding.

Yet he does not accept ithe concept at face value.

“Street style is important for those wishing to find inspiration in others. I, however, do not personally see it from the same perspective. I try to dissect it a bit. To show a more honest view of our current fashion identity. To show those who are avant-garde, and also the so-called ‘tragedies’ who follow the trends like some follow religion.  It’s important for me to show both sides of the spectrum, to give the viewer a transparent insight into a cross-section of modern society, and to then allow them to decide for themselves ‘who’ they want to be. I aim to give people no direction with my photos. Only a peep-hole they can peer through into a world which they may otherwise not have access to.”

“Street style is necessary. People say it will die. So be it. Perhaps it will. However, our desire to know how others live will never diminish if our society continues as it is.”

Street style, via photography, projects images through which people find inspiration. However small in any bigger view, such pictures spur curiosity. They spread interest in fashion to new societal frontiers. Adam believes that street style is necessary, because of society’s desire to know how other people live and look. Perhaps an insatiable desire, perhaps a fleeting one.

“Street style is necessary. People say it will die. So be it. Perhaps it will. However, our desire to know how others live will never diminish if our society continues as it is. Without a view of the streets, we cannot accurately read the barometer of the current fashion market.  Regardless of the influencers, the street still tells us where the industry truly stands.”

Street style might change someday, but the phenomenon comes to life at every fashion week. Street style itself has almost become a show before the real show, at which influencers and icons can be caught by the cameras and create ideas for the person looking at them. Me and you. Though street style is present all over the world, there is a huge difference in the style of each country:

“Scandinavian style, and in-fact Danish style, is, in my opinion, the most honest, realistic, and beautiful execution of how clothes are meant to be worn [no bias]. The climate and the bicycle have forced the way Danes dress to be “real”.  Even the top Danish influencers still dress in a much more wearable and reasonable fashion than, say, the Italians.  Danes even take French shapes, and regurgitate them into a wearable and usable utilitarian uniform which can be worn on the bike, in the office, and even out at the bodega. It’s perfect.”